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Call for contributions exemplifying good practices at country level

In compliance with Paragraph 23 of Resolution A/RES/68/226 and in preparation of the annual report of the Secretary-General on progress toward achieving the MDGs, we are inviting civil society organizations to share examples of good practices of programmes and policies at country level which tackle inequalities and promote the participation of those living in extreme poverty in their design and implementation, keeping the aim of accelerating MDG achievement in mind.

Submissions should reflect policies and programmes where there is uncontroversial evidence to show sustainable impacts in the lives of people. A brief summary (maximum 1,000 words) should be sent by 28 April 2014.

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by Jesmion [NGO]
8 Mar 2017
Iam interested at any giving time, iam interested

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by JC Group [NGO]
28 Feb 2017
JC group from Kerala India we have taken the initiative to protect our woman and children to train and teach them to defend themselves by giving them self defence training and personality development training to mould their mind and physique to get rid of fear and fight back as there has been a huge increase in abuses nad killing we find this mandatoryu in our society and have taken initiative to go down to schools colleges hospitals and IT companies and do this service and inturn develop our services to a wider area.

Our company started at 2004 and our services are done with the talents we have with us hoping for a better Nation and a better tommorrow

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by Biafra [NGO]
21 Feb 2017
Thanks, while am still interested and awaiting for my eligibility

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by Associated Country Women of the World [NGO]
28 Apr 2014
In Ulaanbataar, Mongolia, ACWW funded a project carried out by the Foundation for the Empowerment of Women (FERW) starting in 2009. The project was titled ôRural Women Business Development Projectö.

The project initially aimed to train 60 unemployed rural women to develop bakery and dairy product businesses. Five business groups were developed as a result of the project. The findings from the project feedback survey demonstrated that participants had been able to increase their household income and create employment opportunities using their newly obtained skills. For instance, some women gained employment in kindergartens and schools. The pre-project survey revealed that the average household income before project implementation was 55,000-85,000 tugrik (US$ 48-59/month). In the final survey, the majority of respondents stated that they had been able to increase their income; the average household income had increased to 80,000-100,000 tugrik (US$ 55-69/month).

Health improved as a result of the project, as indicated by testimonials of people like a kindergarten director. Learning food processing techniques increased the availability of food, while learning value adding techniques increased the types of food that the project participants could make. In addition, learning about nutrition meant that more people came to understand the value of skim milk, which had previously been discarded as waste.

Along with income and health, food sufficiency improved due to increased knowledge of preservation. Knowledge transfer was an important component of the project. The project initially aimed to reach 60 women. Ultimately 100 women were trained directly, and 400 women benefited from the traineesĺ sharing of knowledge.

The project was also important to the implementing organization, FEWR. It learned about the importance of training packages when developing business groups. It resolved to diversify the topics of future trainings.

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by Associated Country Women of the World [NGO]
28 Apr 2014
In Ulaanbataar, Mongolia, ACWW funded a project carried out by the Foundation for the Empowerment of Women (FERW) starting in 2009. The project was titled ôRural Women Business Development Projectö.

The project initially aimed to train 60 unemployed rural women to develop bakery and dairy product businesses. Five business groups were developed as a result of the project. The findings from the project feedback survey demonstrated that participants had been able to increase their household income and create employment opportunities using their newly obtained skills. For instance, some women gained employment in kindergartens and schools. The pre-project survey revealed that the average household income before project implementation was 55,000-85,000 tugrik (US$ 48-59/month). In the final survey, the majority of respondents stated that they had been able to increase their income; the average household income had increased to 80,000-100,000 tugrik (US$ 55-69/month).

Health improved as a result of the project, as indicated by testimonials of people like a kindergarten director. Learning food processing techniques increased the availability of food, while learning value adding techniques increased the types of food that the project participants could make. In addition, learning about nutrition meant that more people came to understand the value of skim milk, which had previously been discarded as waste.

Along with income and health, food sufficiency improved due to increased knowledge of preservation. Knowledge transfer was an important component of the project. The project initially aimed to reach 60 women. Ultimately 100 women were trained directly, and 400 women benefited from the traineesĺ sharing of knowledge.

The project was also important to the implementing organization, FEWR. It learned about the importance of training packages when developing business groups. It resolved to diversify the topics of future trainings.

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by Association for Women's Career Development in Hungary [NGO]
2 Apr 2014

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